Wall&decò: if the bathroom becomes a cathedral

The brand presents the new Wet System 2020 collection of wallcoverings for damp spaces, reproducing the windows of a cathedral, abstract flowers and vintage shores

Domestic Cathedral by Ctrlzak
Domestic Cathedral by Ctrlzak

Goodbye to boring bathrooms: with Wall&decò it is possible to personalize spaces, even wet zones, with the artistic design wallcoverings of the Wet System, patented coverings made to measure, aesthetically refined but strong and easy to wash with traditional detergents.

Domestic Cathedral by Ctrlzak

Among the subjects of the 2020 collection, Domestic Cathedral by the studio CTRLZAK is a wallpaper that transforms the inside of a shower cabin into an artistic window of a medieval cathedral: “We spend some of our most private moments in the bathroom. We have true revelations in the shower. Sometimes we also see the light, and everything light can signify for all of us. Our bathrooms are our sacred places, of reflection and bliss… Welcome to the Domestic Cathedral, where miracles happen every day!”, CTRLZAK say.

Then there is the Lido design by DEBONADEMEO, like a black and white photograph of a seaside resort from the 1950s, described as follows by its designers: “Shadow and light, black and white alternate in a domestic set that dematerializes the walls through the three-dimensional effect of a curtain of ribbons, moved by the wind and memories. On the surface there are images of distant summers that are transformed into intimate, private memories of universal beauty. Generating synesthetic effects, the vision of the present blends with the film frames of a past that lives again, suggesting the sounds of an old film projector, soft voices, the waves of the sea, in an intimate, relaxing atmosphere that invades spaces.”

Lido by Debonademeo Reginae by Antonella GuIdi

Finally, Reginae by Antonella Guidi is an abstract, geometric floral composition: “The encounter with this flower with its elegant presence in a garden, facing an avenue of plane trees in Sardinia. It seemed to be calling me, as only certain flowers can. I looked at it for a long time, and I wanted to depict it in all its magnificence, but in that moment a gust of wind concealed it behind a grating, and from back there it whispered to me, gently: ‘You can depict me, but only with true simplicity.’”