Taba: free-form precision

A digital launch and a destiny of opportunity for Taba, the seating family designed by Alfredo Häberli for Moroso. For public and private spaces, intertwining forms, ergonomics and poetry

Moroso, Taba by Alfredo Haberli. Photo credits © Alessandro Paderni
Moroso, Taba by Alfredo Haberli. Photo credits © Alessandro Paderni

Taba strives for precision to offer many opportunities, of seating, interlocks and interaction. It is composed of 8 pieces: a sofa, two armchairs, five ottomans, created by the Swiss-Argentine designer Alfredo Häberli to adapt to a multifunctional existence, thanks to the overlapping of various organic lines. Ways to sit, to converse, to work.
Rigorous geometric forms blend with the poetry of nature, generating asymmetrical, soft pieces that alternate flat surfaces and curved zones to adapt to a wide range of everyday uses.

Moroso, Taba by Alfredo Haberli. Photo credits © Alessandro Paderni
Moroso, Taba by Alfredo Haberli. Photo credits © Alessandro Paderni

“The tame I wanted to develop with Taba,” Häberli says, “is the weaving together of form and poetry. Of what is linear, and what is elusive.” And “in a company like Moroso, cultivating the impulse of the idea that defies the rules is easy for me.” Hence the successful liaison with an Italian company that in the time of the pandemic has launched the collection online and on the social networks, narrating the creative process in a documentary film of almost 3 minutes.

The presentation also provides the justification for a name that takes its inspiration from the background of the designer himself. It comes from an old game of skill played by Argentine campesinos: Taba was a game like jacks, involving knucklebones thrown onto the ground and picked up while bouncing a ball. A childhood memory, an emotion that undoubtedly lives on in this project.

Moroso, Taba by Alfredo Haberli. Photo credits © Alessandro Paderni
Moroso, Taba by Alfredo Haberli. Photo credits © Alessandro Paderni